Where Death is a Hunter

Where Death is a Hunter

Where Death is a Hunter

Recommended Age: 16+

Warnings: Character Death, Surgery, Mild Violence, Mentions of Alcoholism / Hallucinations

Pages: 371 (Paperback)


Christopher Stookey’s Where Death is a Hunter was recently sent to me by Full of Books to review. As with most of my readings assigned for review, I enjoyed the book more than I expected to.  As an avid YA-Fiction fan, I rarely decide to read books from other genres – especially medical thrillers. However, I definitely enjoyed the change in genre, even for just one book.

 Hannah Fatier has just started her first job as an anesthesiologist at Deaconess Hospital in San Francisco, she has just bought a new home, and she is newly engaged. In short, Hannah’s life is going well. That is, until a patient under Hannah’s care dies of mysterious causes during a routine operation. An investigation of the case reveals the cause of death to be a basic medical error that Hannah seems to be responsible for. When she decides to dig deeper into the records concerning the case, Hannah discovers a number of puzzling inconsistencies. She begins to suspect that someone has framed her for the death of her patient, but who? And more importantly, why?

Let me get this straight: I consider myself to be a ‘scaredy-cat’. I jump easily at horror films, don’t enjoy “scary” activities, and hate seeing blood and gore. However, the medical and thriller aspects of this book didn’t bother me at all. I enjoyed the fact that the book included facts and statistics, which provided further insight to the medical world. (For example: did you know that at least 44,000 people die in hospitals each year because of medical errors?) The plot did not drag back or rush ahead; it moved at a perfect pace. The big reveal of ‘whodunit’ is an unexpected plot twist, and the novel has a strong conclusion. The only drawback is the fact that there was almost no character development. Hannah does learn that she cannot trust everyone, but there is no big realization or change from the beginning to the end of the book.

 

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